Program 2016

friday


  • Connector.

    Welcome to Sørveiv Conference!

    10:00
    Introduction
    by Daniel Nordgård, Lily Armstrong, Andy Inglis

  • Connector.

    Let’s Talk About Sex (and Other Awkward Questions About Women and The Music Industry)

    10:10
    Keynote
    Referencing a study she’s conducting as part of her Let’s Change The Record project, Sally Gross of University of Westminster London opens Sørveiv to ask whether, in this post-feminist age, is it still relevant to ask questions about gender diversity in the music industry? As a music industry professional and a teacher she believes it is not only relevant but crucial that we ask awkward questions about the current state of gender relations and diversity in the music industry, and indeed wider society as a whole

  • Connector.

    Challenge, Rebuild, Embrace, Sustain

    10:30
    Panel
    Søren B. Kristensen, Rahel Debebe-Dessalegne, Anna Wilrodt and Sally Gross discuss what we can do to ensure that, in the future, our industry isn’t run by middle-aged and old white men for the benefit of middle-aged and old white men, with a specific focus on practical initiatives to encourage those from other groups into our business, regardless of gender, race or background.

  • Connector.

    The Kristiansand Roundtable Conference

    11:20
    Panel
    Since its first meeting in 2007, The Kristiansand Roundtable Conference has gathered together a broad range of high-level observers, participants and executives from the international music industry, to discuss current issues, particularly the recorded music industry. This invite-only event, housed in discrete surroundings, attracts managers, record companies, publishers, collecting societies, streaming services, ISPs and many of the digital giants which have become household names. Funded by the University of Agder, and hosted by Peter Jenner and Daniel Nordgård, the Conference is taking place in the days leading up to Sørveiv, and during the course of this panel we’ll give you an insight into what progress is being made in an industry that’s facing considerable technological and legal challenges, as those who hold the power discuss the future shape of the music business. With Peter Jenner and others.

    LUNCH 12:30

  • Connector.

    Dissecting The Digital Dollar (Part 2)

    13:30
    Keynote
    Fiona McGugan – General Manager of the UK’s Music Managers Forum – will present the second part of their landmark report, focusing on the key issues with the way digital services are licensed, and how digital royalties are processed and shared. The report explores the findings from numerous debates and discussions with over 200 managers, artists, lawyers, accountants, labels, publishers, DSPs, CMOs and policy makers in London, Paris, LA, New York and Toronto. This is an unprecedented study and we’re delighted to give Fiona a platform to discuss it

  • Connector.

    Digits and dollars

    13:50
    Panel
    Fiona McGugan, Virpi Immonen, Pete Bott and Daniel Nordgård will chew on the juiciest chunks of Dissecting The Digital Dollar (Part 2), give their thoughts and perspectives from their areas of the industry, and maybe do a little fortune-telling for us all

  • Connector.

    Soapboxes

    14:55

    The first of our quick-fire (10-15 minute) platforms on which our most impassioned, outspoken delegates can stand uninterrupted to introduce an idea or opinion – provocative or otherwise – with counter-arguments coming from the audience at the conclusion.

    Disruptive Innovation? What Disruptive Innovation?!

    When Clayton Christensen introduced his theory of Disruptive Innovation in 2008, he described innovative companies catering for new consumers in new ways. This theory and others (anyone remember the Long Tail?) have been used to enthusiastically describe digital change in the music industries ever since Napster at the turn of the Millennium. However, the theories of disruptive innovation have a central feature, namely a predicted fall of market leaders, at the expense of the smaller, fresher ones. And just like with Chris Anderson’s Long Tail (a rise of ‘niche’) this has yet to actually happen. In fact, we’re seeing the opposite! The music industries are definitely experiencing disruptions, but for some reason the optimism that should accompany these theories is missing. Daniel Nordgård will build on his own and other current research, and argue that we’re certainly seeing disruptions, but not in the form of disruptive innovations

    Kate Hewett

    The Sheffield Tramlines Festival marketing and program director will regale us with a talk on a topic to be revealed in the online program nearer to the Conference opening day

    From Overwhelming to I’ve Got This – My Music Industry in Six Months

    Kristiansand artist manager Kathrine Wallevik and Andy Inglis went on a series of field trips to London, Berlin – and an actual field – to introduce her to the international music industry. Let’s see how that worked out for her…

    Let’s get Physical!

    Why do we sustain the album format if the audience aren’t streaming albums? One EDM act in Norway was excluded from Spellemannprisen (Norway’s Grammies) despite being able to sell out the 18,000 capacity Barclay Center in Brooklyn because he hadn’t released music on an applicable long-playing format. Is the album dead, or is it just evolving? Are releases like Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ the new manifestation of this most romantic of formats? Kristian Kallevik of Norway’s finest record shop (and record label) extols the virtues and beauty of the physical format in a digital world. And if we’re lucky, he might offer some advice on good posture and firm handshakes in modern dealmaking

  • Connector.

    Reimagining the Music Business

    16:30
    Panel
    Virpi Immonen, Kristian Kallevik and Cecilie Torp-Holte.
    The pressures on labels to survive and grow, and deliver a great worldwide service for their artists is significant, and when the working day draws to a close, staff have families to look after and box-sets to watch. How can managers adapt to work more closely with labels and ensure their artists’ potential is met? Should all managers be aiming (as some have done) to hire their own marketing, promotion and even international staff to compliment and interface with those at the labels? We’ll let the managers on the panel (along with a label and an academic) work it out.

 
 
 

saturday

  • Connector.

    Introduction & friday summary

    10:00
    By Daniel Nordgård, Lily Armstrong, Andy Inglis

  • Connector.

    Knut Schreiner: Romantic Entrepreneurs!

    10:15
    Keynote
    In which ways has streaming changed the landscape for the 21st Century Artist? What have we lost? What have we gained? What value has new, recorded music in today’s society, and what is the artist’s role? Is streaming a superstar economy, favouring only the biggest, most established artists? Or can we also spot a revolution in the recorded music industry with innovation and democratisation, expressed perhaps through EDM culture? What does it mean for an art form when you reach a new level of reproduction, and disruptive technologies change some of the frameworks completely?

  • Connector.

    Why music is special

    10:40
    Panel
    Robert Hellbig, Knut Schreiner, Bengi Unsal and Kristiansand’s own Jan Bang are all in some way privileged enough to make a living from the performance of music. They’ll talk about its place in their own hearts, and its standing in society as an art form. From opera to experimental noise, from birth to our last breath, it soundtracks our every waking moment. When something so beautiful becomes so ubiquitous, how do we find the time and space to reconnect with the one thing that unites the whole of humanity?

  • Connector.

    Protecting artists & art

    11:25
    Keynote
    Before the internet, artists gave as much or as little of themselves to the media and public as they chose to, and via far fewer channels. But now the audience has the power in many respects. When Justin Bieber says “no more meet and greets”, his fans turn on him. How does exposing ‘everything, always’ affect artists’ health, and what can we do to better protect it, and them, to ensure they’re still well enough to produce the art they’re compelled to make? As an artist manager, tour manager, lecturer and mentor, Andy Inglis paints a sometimes scathing picture of an industry that often seems to have little regard for those it should be keeping safe from harm

  • Connector.

    protecting artists & art

    11:45
    Panel
    Artists William Doyle, Anita Blay and others discuss the impact of the often-overwhelming social and industry pressures on their health and art. We don’t talk about this in public enough. It starts now.

    LUNCH 12:30

  • Connector.

    soapbox

    13:30

  • Connector.

    Ticketing and Live Sustainability - keynote

    13:50
    Keynote
    It is estimated, in 2015 secondary ticketing services made over $6B (3 times the total made by all music subscription services combined) yet the global music press barely mentions it. Mark Meharry, the founder and CEO of Music Glue, explores this paradox and discusses some potential solutions to the problem.

  • Connector.

    ticketing and live sustainability - panel

    14:20
    Panel
    Following Mark’s Soapbox, Ross Allmark, Kate Hewettand Thomas Litangen will dissect the primary and secondary markets of one of the most controversial, divisive and lucrative sectors of the music industries

  • Connector.

    soapboxes

    15:30

    Ticketmaster

    The live economy accounts for more than 50% of the entire music economy. Ticketing is more important than ever and competition is increasing. We’ll hear from Øyvind Skjold Jevne of market leader Ticketmaster on the current climate, and where we’re heading

    Norske Konsertarrangører: Are we digging our own graves?

    Concert venues and clubs are run on slim margins and are dependent on alcohol sales and the political goodwill for it to survive. While they once were the most important sales arena for the music business, they are now marginalised and exponents for a form of cultural expression that is losing ground. Without concert venues and clubs we are losing something irreplacable: an arena for refining musical talent, production environments and not least audience. We need concert venues more than ever, and Jon Gotteberg will explain why we are digging our own graves.

    Live Nation

    The Norwegian live music scene is booming! There are more festivals and more concerts than ever. But what defines the Norwegian live music industry and what makes this market different from others, if anything? We’ll get Live Nation’s perspective from Odd Inge Sneve, who’s worked with the country’s biggest concerts and festivals since the Quart Festival in the mid ‘90s.

    Music in Life & Death

    Dr. Mark Taubert, introduced by Andy Inglis
    When David Bowie’s death was announced earlier this year, Mark wrote an open letter to the Starman about how much his music meant to him, and his thoughts on how Bowie’s death – and how he used it to shape his final album – spoke to him both as a palliative care doctor, and as a music lover. The letter was shared by Bowie’s son on social media, and went viral, with Jarvis Cocker reciting it at the Letters Live Festival. Via a recorded video, Mark encourages us to consider the profound impact music can have on all of us, as much in death as in life. And, if we can get our technological shit together, Andy will talk to Mark via Skype

  • Connector.

    closing remarks and thanks

    17:00
    Daniel Nordgård, Lily Armstrong and Andy Inglis bid you a tearful farewell.